Which Patient Is Most At Risk For The Development Of Either Community Or Hospital Acquired Pneumonia?

Why are hospital patients often at risk for developing pneumonia?

People can be more likely to get pneumonia while in the hospital if they: Abuse alcohol.

Have had chest surgery or other major surgery.

Have a weak immune system from cancer treatment, certain medicines, or severe wounds..

How common is community acquired pneumonia?

Bacterial causes pneumoniae accounts for 2 to 5% of community-acquired pneumonia and is the 2nd most common cause of lung infections in healthy people aged 5 to 35 years.

What is the average hospital stay for pneumonia?

According to the most recent national data from the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project Nationwide Inpatient Sample from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, the average length of stay for pneumonia in the U.S. was 5.4 days.

What are the 4 stages of pneumonia?

Four Stages of PneumoniaCongestion. This stage occurs within the first 24 hours of contracting pneumonia. … Red Hepatization. This stage occurs two to three days after congestion. … Grey Hepatization. This stage will occur two to three days after red hepatization and is an avascular stage. … Resolution. … ‍ … Is Pneumonia Contagious?

How is hospital acquired pneumonia treated?

The recommended antibiotics for the treatment of suspected MSSA infections include piperacillin-tazobactam, cefepime, levofloxacin, imipenem, and meropenem. When the pathogen is confirmed as MSSA, the patient should be switched to oxacillin, nafcillin, or cefazolin.

What is the best treatment for community acquired pneumonia?

Levofloxacin 750 mg PO q24h or.Moxifloxacin 400 mg PO q24h or.Combination of a beta-lactam ( amoxicillin 1 g PO q8h or amoxicillin-clavulanate 2 g PO q12h or ceftriaxone 1g IV/IM q24h or cefuroxime 500 mg PO BID) plus a macrolide (azithromycin or clarithromycin)

Who is most at risk from hospital acquired infections?

All hospitalized patients are susceptible to contracting a nosocomial infection. Some patients are at greater risk than others-young children, the elderly, and persons with compromised immune systems are more likely to get an infection.

What percentage of pneumonia patients die?

This can lead to a rapid decline in condition. Most people do eventually recover from pneumonia. However, the 30-day mortality rate is 5 to 10 percent of hospitalized patients. It can be up to 30 percent in those admitted to intensive care.

How do you prevent hospital acquired infections?

10 Steps to Preventing Spread of Infection in HospitalsWash Your Hands. Hand washing should be the cornerstone of reducing HAIs. … Create an Infection-Control Policy. … Identify Contagions ASAP. … Provide Infection Control Education. … Use Gloves. … Provide Isolation-Appropriate Personal Protective Equipment. … Disinfect and Keep Surfaces Clean. … Prevent Patients From Walking Barefoot.More items…•

What disease can you catch in hospital?

Most Common Healthcare-Associated Infections: 25 Bacteria, Viruses Causing HAIsAcinetobacter baumannii. … Bacteroides fragilis. … Burkholderia cepacia. … Clostridium difficile. … Clostridium sordellii. … Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae. … Enterococcus faecalis. … Escherichia coli.More items…•

What is commonly used orally to prevent hospital acquired pneumonia?

Chlorhexidine gluconate 0.12% oral rinse reduces the incidence of total nosocomial respiratory infection and nonprophylactic systemic antibiotic use in patients undergoing heart surgery.

Who is at risk for hospital acquired pneumonia?

Risk factors for hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP) include mechanical ventilation for > 48 h, residence in an ICU, duration of ICU or hospital stay, severity of underlying illness, and presence of comorbidities. Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, and Enterobacter are the most common causes of HAP.

What is the most common cause of community acquired pneumonia?

Worldwide, Streptococcus pneumoniae is a bacteria that is most often responsible for CAP in adults. Some other common bacteria that cause CAP are: Haemophilus influenzae.

What is the difference between community acquired pneumonia and hospital acquired pneumonia?

Hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP) or nosocomial pneumonia refers to any pneumonia contracted by a patient in a hospital at least 48–72 hours after being admitted. It is thus distinguished from community-acquired pneumonia. It is usually caused by a bacterial infection, rather than a virus.

How long does it take to recover from community acquired pneumonia?

With treatment, most people improve within 2 weeks. Older adults or very sick people may need longer treatment. Those who may be more likely to have complicated pneumonia include: Older adults.

What is the number one hospital acquired infection?

“On an annual basis, surgical site infections (158,639) and Clostridium difficile infections (133,657) were estimated to be the most frequent hospital-acquired infections nationwide,” accounting for 36% and 30% of the total number.

Can you get pneumonia from laying around?

Pneumonia can be caused by bacteria and some viruses. So you need to make sure that people who touch you aren’t transmitting any nasty germs. Ask when you can start moving around. Lying flat on your back for a long time can increase your risk of developing pneumonia.

How is community acquired pneumonia diagnosed?

Diagnosis is suggested by a history of cough, dyspnea, pleuritic pain, or acute functional or cognitive decline, with abnormal vital signs (e.g., fever, tachycardia) and lung examination findings. Diagnosis should be confirmed by chest radiography or ultrasonography.