What Causes Pneumococcal Pneumonia?

What are the symptoms of pneumococcal pneumonia?

Pneumococcal pneumonia (lung infection) is the most common serious form of pneumococcal disease.

Symptoms include: Fever and chills….Symptoms include:Confusion or disorientation.Shortness of breath.High heart rate.Fever, shivering, or feeling very cold.Extreme pain or discomfort.Clammy or sweaty skin..

How contagious is pneumococcal pneumonia?

For example, Mycobacterium and Mycoplasma organisms are highly contagious, but other types, including pneumococcal pneumonia, require optimal conditions to spread to another person and are weakly contagious.

How do you feel when you have pneumonia?

Early symptoms are similar to influenza symptoms: fever, a dry cough, headache, muscle pain, and weakness. Within a day or two, the symptoms typically get worse, with increasing cough, shortness of breath and muscle pain. There may be a high fever and there may be blueness of the lips.

How common is pneumococcal disease?

Streptococcus pneumoniae is the leading cause of community-acquired pneumonia and the incidence is estimated at one per one thousand adults per year. The introduction of Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) vaccine in the 1990s dramatically reduced invasive Hib disease in many European countries and led to S.

How do you get pneumococcal pneumonia?

Pneumococcus is spread through contact with people who are ill or who carry the bacteria in their throat. You can get pneumococcal pneumonia from respiratory droplets from the nose or mouth of an infected person. It is common for people, especially children, to carry the bacteria in their throats without being sick.

What is the incubation period for pneumococcal pneumonia?

Pneumococcus is spread by airborne or direct exposure to respiratory droplets from a person who is infected or carrying the bacteria. How soon after exposure do symptoms occur? The incubation period may vary, but, it is generally 1 to 3 days.

What are the 4 stages of pneumonia?

Four Stages of PneumoniaCongestion. This stage occurs within the first 24 hours of contracting pneumonia. … Red Hepatization. This stage occurs two to three days after congestion. … Grey Hepatization. This stage will occur two to three days after red hepatization and is an avascular stage. … Resolution. … ‍ … Is Pneumonia Contagious?

Who is most at risk for pneumococcal pneumonia?

Conditions that increase the risk of invasive pneumococcal disease among adults include:Decreased immune function from disease or drugs.Functional or anatomic asplenia.Chronic heart, lung (including asthma), liver, or renal disease.Cigarette smoking.Cerebrospinal fluid leak or cochlear implant.

How long does pneumococcal pneumonia last?

Younger than 2 years old: four shots (at 2 months, 4 months, 6 months, and then a booster between 12 and 15 months) 65 years old or older: two shots, which will last you the rest of your life. Between 2 and 64 years old: between one and three shots if you have certain immune system disorders or if you’re a smoker.

What diseases does pneumococcal vaccine prevent?

PCV13 (pneumococcal conjugate vaccine) protects against 13 of the approximately 90 types of pneumococcal bacteria that can cause the most serious types of pneumococcal disease, including pneumonia, meningitis, and bacteremia.

What antibiotic treats pneumonia?

First-line antibiotics that might be selected include the macrolide antibiotics azithromycin (Zithromax) or clarithromycin (Biaxin XL); or the tetracycline known as doxycycline.

What causes pneumococcal disease?

Pneumococcal [noo-muh-KOK-uhl] disease is a name for any infection caused by bacteria called Streptococcus pneumoniae, or pneumococcus. Pneumococcal infections can range from ear and sinus infections to pneumonia and bloodstream infections. There are vaccines to help prevent pneumococcal disease.

What is the best treatment for pneumococcal pneumonia?

Antibiotics can treat pneumococcal disease. However, many types of pneumococcal bacteria have become resistant to some of the antibiotics used to treat these infections. Available data [5.24 MB, 114 pages] show that pneumococcal bacteria are resistant to one or more antibiotics in 3 out of every 10 cases.

How is pneumococcal pneumonia prevented?

There are two vaccines that help prevent pneumococcal disease among adults 65 years or older. Both vaccines are safe and effective, but they cannot be given at the same time. Two vaccines offer protection against pneumococcal disease: PCV13 and PPSV23. CDC recommends all adults 65 years or older get a shot of PPSV23.

How long can pneumonia last?

Pneumonia can hang around for about two weeks, or even longer in young children, elderly adults, and those who have weakened immune systems or ongoing illness like chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or asthma. Even healthy people may feel tired or weak for a month or more after their lungs clear up.